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Do claims by the Alberta government that the Trans Mountain pipeline would generate $18.5 billion for “roads, schools, and hospitals,” 15,000 jobs during construction, and 37,000 jobs per year stand up to scrutiny?

Kaity Doiron, a student in the public health program at the University of Lethbridge who recently completed a practicum placement with Parkland Institute, summarizes the findings of her research into the Alberta public policy implications of the internationally accepted principles of public health and the Social Determinants of Health.

Fertility services

At the boundary of public and private health care

What Alberta Health’s recent decision to end non-insured fertility services at the Royal Alexandra Hospital’s Regional Fertility and Women’s Endocrine Clinic says about Alberta's commitment to health equity and truly universal public health care.

Parkland Institute research manager Rebecca Graff-Mcrae blogs about her visit to one of Alberta's private membership clinics, and the findings of her recently released report, Blurred Lines.

The Redwater legal case

The Supreme Court battle we should all be paying attention to

With the legal battle surrounding Redwater Energy Corporation likely to advance to the Supreme Court, we should all be paying attention to the case, which will determine whether the polluter or the public pays to clean up orphan wells.

Ian Hussey debunks the recent CD Howe Institute report that claims the move by the Alberta government to increase the provincial minimum wage to $15 in 2018 could lead to 25,000 job losses.

September 30, 2017 is the 50th anniversary of the opening of the first large oil sands mine and processing plant in Alberta. Parkland Institute research manager Ian Hussey suggests five things to consider as we mark the anniversary.

A rising tide doesn’t lift all boats

What Census 2016 reveals about income inequality in Alberta

While the data on income from the 2016 census released last week has been presented as a good-news story, a closer look reveals a persistent and troubling degree of income inequality in Alberta.

The Alberta government is reviewing its Occupational Health and Safety Act for the first time since it was enacted in 1976. Based on the results of a recent worker survey, here are suggestions for changes that can be made to increase worker and workplace safety.

Alberta's oil industry is held up as one of the province's main source of "good jobs," but how the sector is experienced by those who work in it varies greatly based on gender and race.

 

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