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Recent Research

Job Creation or Job Loss?

Big Companies Use Tax Cut to Automate Away Jobs in the Oil Sands

This report explains how the four biggest oil sands companies received $4.3 billion in tax cuts from the UCP government since 2019 through the so-called Job Creation Tax Cut, while at the same time eliminating thousands of employees from their payrolls. The research shows the Big Four used the tax giveaway to increase executives pay and boost cash transfers to shareholders, while accelerating automation and cutting jobs.

Alberta Charities to Lose Millions Under Bill 32

Survey Reveals Unions Reducing Support to Organizations by 38%

The UCP government’s Bill 32 will cost Alberta charities millions in lost donations. Based on an extensive survey of Alberta unions, this study shows how the law’s ‘opt-in’ provisions — which took effect in August 2022 — will affect the non-profit sector.

Recent Blog Posts

Better Way Alberta

Parkland Contributes Research to Provincewide Initiative

Recently Parkland Institute had the opportunity to work with our friends at the Alberta Federation of Labour, Public Interest Alberta, and Friends of Medicare on a campaign called Better Way Alberta. We have produced five short research reports that included clear, implementable, and evidence-based policy recommendations on areas of public policy that are of critical importance today.

What Was She Thinking?

A Glimpse Into Danielle Smith’s Mind

The most in-depth glimpse into Premier Smith’s thinking on a range of critical public policy issues is contained in a 20-page paper entitled “Alberta’s Key Challenges and Opportunities.” Smith’s paper was published in June 2021, before oil and gas prices rose and substantially changed the province’s fiscal outlook. In this blog, Robert Ascah outlines and analyzes her fiscal policy ideas and health-care proposals.

Alberta’s new premier Danielle Smith is taking the reins of government at a time when many families are struggling to pay their bills. Inflation is high. The wages of many Albertans are not keeping up. Alberta’s minimum wage has been frozen at $15 since October 1, 2018. Premier Smith could give minimum-wage workers a hand up during these difficult times by raising the minimum wage. The UCP government should also legislate annual increases to the minimum wage that align with the annual rate of inflation.